understanding obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD)

Posted by One in Five Minds on Sep 22, 2017 2:16:05 PM

Imagine waking up in the morning and sitting up in bed, and repeating that action 41 more times.Imagine turning your body to put your feet on the floor 42 times.

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Topics: Mental Health Conditions

the troubling stats on teen suicide among hispanic girls

Posted by Michele Brown on Jul 19, 2017 2:42:27 PM

The devastating statistics on teen suicide are startling, and should be taken seriously by any parent, especially if your child has existing mental health issues. Suicide is, sadly, the second leading cause of death (after traffic fatalities) for teenagers in the U.S., accounting for eight deaths per 100,000 teens.

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Topics: Mental Health Conditions, Parenting Kids With Mental Illness

stress vs. trauma: one is not like the other

Posted by Michele Brown on Apr 12, 2017 8:00:00 AM

Occasional stress is a disruptive but normal part of a child’s life: whether it’s getting ready on time to catch the bus, having a lot of homework, or starting a new school. Children often have a difficult time managing their stress and need some guidance, which, as adults with experience, we can often provide if we take the time. Ideas like outdoor play, reading time, talking about the challenge, and taking some quiet time are all familiar ways we can teach them.

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Topics: Mental Health Conditions, Parenting Kids With Mental Illness

seasonal affective disorder and the winter blues

Posted by Mike Hannan on Jan 24, 2017 1:00:00 PM

As the nights get longer, the days get colder and the sky clouds over for days at a time, many people – including children – find themselves feeling tired, listless, sad and longing for spring on occasion. And that’s normal. For some though, the feelings are relentless and can be debilitating, affecting our health, our work and our home life. When the winter blues become much more, it’s known as Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) and left untreated, could lead to serious complications.

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Topics: Mental Health Conditions

"Don't Talk About My Child That Way!"

Posted by One in Five Minds on Feb 23, 2016 9:56:32 AM

The old adage “Sticks and stones may break my bones, but words can never hurt me,” is simply not true. Words are powerful. Use the right ones and you can make a great first impression, get that promotion you’ve been seeking, or land a date with your crush. Use the wrong words and you could miss an opportunity, lose a job, or alienate friends and family. That’s why it’s so important to choose your words carefully, especially when it comes to speaking to parents who have children with a mental illness. The wrong words can be upsetting and damaging. It’s important to note, that this isn’t merely a trend to be politically correct. Instead, this is about being respectful and responsible with your words to facilitate better communication. One in five children suffer from mental illness; that’s 80,000 children in Bexar County alone. Chances are you know parents who have a child or children with a mental illness. When speaking to them, please pay attention to the following considerations of what not to say.

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Topics: Mental Health Conditions, Parenting Kids With Mental Illness

Is ADHD considered a mental illness?

Posted by One in Five Minds on Apr 8, 2015 2:51:00 PM

Are you surprised by the question in the title? Maybe you’ve thought ADHD was only a behavioral disorder.

However, many children living with ADHD have difficulty focusing their attention on necessary tasks and using working memory effectively, making ADHD a cognitive disorder as well. ADHD is a developmental condition of inattention and distractibility, with or without hyperactivity.

Take, for instance, Thomas, a middle school student. Thomas has difficulty staying on task and completing his schoolwork. He also has problems keeping his backpack and papers organized and remembering what to bring home or take to school. He might read a chapter but not retain what he has read. He might know the material but be unable to write an answer or start a paper because he cannot organize his thoughts. He might be able to write out math equations, but makes careless errors along the way. He also has problems keeping track of his personal items and keeping his bedroom organized.

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Topics: Mental Health Conditions